Saturday, October 31, 2015

PASSPORT TO TREASON (1956)



Super popular western and TV star, Rod Cameron, gets work overseas in modern day London. His stoic persona and physical presence adds credence as the lone American in this British film. His deadpan delivery never lights up the screen in this fog-fest, however. A slow start might make you fast forward but there is no need. There is always a change of pace and the film climaxes at the end, as low-budget movies are supposed to do. Not a lot of action. The brief fist fight sound effects, however, sounds as though each blow completely crushes every facial bone. Cameron is the detective out to discover the hidden purpose of a peace organization. As to be expected, he is captured and given a truth serum to reveal what he knows. As expected, he manages a night escape, stealing a car to get away. What I think was the influence from the serum, he weaves erratically from lane to lane. In reality, he may actually be forgetting to drive on the left. Mostly night scenes can cover a lot of editing mistakes. The film only brightens at the end. Still it plays out more like an early forties serial mystery. There is nothing gritty to be seen here. All quite familiar. A fairly intelligent script that never quite gets the heart pounding. Except for the lovely Lois Maxwell a few years before her famous 007 role. Here, ironically, working for MI5. She had connections.

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